Library

    • Posted on February 20, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Many coin enthusiasts collect mint errors. These are coins that bear some sort of flaw acquired during the minting process. In general, errors are classified into three categories: planchet preparation errors, occurring when there is something wrong with the blank metal from which the coin is struck; strike errors, which occur when something goes wrong with the striking process; and hub or die errors, occurring when there is something wrong with the die itself.
    Read More

    • Posted on February 13, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Though the early United States was theoretically on a bimetallic standard – with both gold and silver legal tender – the actual use of gold and silver coinage fluctuated with the prices of those metals. The California Gold Rush of the late 1840s brought a great deal of gold onto the market. This increased the price of silver relative to gold, and much American silver coinage was exported or melted during this period.
    Read More

    • Posted on February 6, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    For over a century, Silver Dollar coins were workhorses of the American economy. They were used constantly in day-to-day transactions from 1794 through the mid-20th century. Over the years, a staggering quantity were struck – around a half billion pieces in total! While quite a few of these coins have been melted and destroyed since many still remain. Today, Silver Dollars are considered both collectibles and bullion pieces. They are traded in bulk among collectors, investors, accumulators and dealers. This article describes how bulk Silver Dollars are categorized, graded and marketed.
    Read More

    • Posted on January 30, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    In the field of modern American coins, an interesting phenomenon has developed. Ironically, coins that were extremely unpopular at the time of issue have evolved into highly desirable numismatic rarities. That is, coins that were largely shunned by the public upon release have become extremely valuable and sought-after. As paradoxical as this phenomenon sounds, it has repeated itself over and over again.
    Read More

    • Posted on January 23, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    One of the most misunderstood terms in numismatics is the word “restrike.” In its strictest sense, a restrike is a coin made from original dies at a later year. However, the word is used for a wide variety of other reproductions, copies, recreations and later issues. This article will describe the various types of restrikes and how they are perceived by the numismatic marketplace.
    Read More

    • Posted on January 16, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Elgin, Illinois is not a city of particularly national importance. Nonetheless, Elgin became the subject of a US Mint-issued commemorative coin in 1936 thanks to the efforts of Trygve Rovelstad, a native of the town. Rovelstad, the son of Norwegian immigrants, sought to erect a memorial sculpture in Elgin honoring the city’s earliest settlers. He was familiar with the concept of commemorative half dollars, which were commonly issued at that time to raise funds for a specific cause. In 1935, Rovelstad was successful in lobbying his Congressman to introduce legislation authorizing a half dollar with the intent of raising funds for his memorial.
    Read More

    • Posted on January 9, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Thomas Jefferson’s government did not originally intend to acquire the Louisiana Purchase. Jefferson was chiefly concerned with preserving American trading access to the Mississippi River and the city of New Orleans. Amid the turmoil of the Napoleonic Wars in Europe and a slave revolt in what is now Haiti, it was unclear whether France would be capable of defending its possessions in North America against Great Britain. Jefferson initially offered to purchase just New Orleans and a small amount of land for $10 million, but Napoleon replied with an offer of the entire territory for just $15 million.
    Read More

    • Posted on January 2, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    It’s by no means the scarcest or most expensive of all U.S. coins, but the storied 1909-S V.D.B. Lincoln Cent may very well be the most famous. The coin is ubiquitous among collectors, but it’s also well-known outside of numismatic circles too. Many Americans either fantasized of stumbling upon one in everyday pocket change – or buying one to complete their Wheat Penny collections.
    Read More

    • Posted on December 26, 2016
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Ezra Meeker traveled the Oregon Trail by ox-drawn wagon with his family as a young settler in 1852. Concerned that the history of the pioneers that traversed the Oregon Trail was becoming lost, he retraced his route from Iowa to Oregon in 1906-1908, attracting much publicity. For the remainder of his long life, he sought to memorialize the Oregon Trail through a variety of means.
    Read More

    • Posted on December 19, 2016
    • By TPM
    • Library

    As a young nobleman in France, the Marquis de Lafayette was inspired by the nascent rebellion in Britain's American colonies. At the age of 19, the wealthy Marquis sailed to America and obtained a commission as a Major General in the Continental Army. He distinguished himself in battle and was useful in obtaining official support from the French monarchy later in the war. He commanded forces at the decisive Battle of Yorktown in 1781 and returned to France the following year as a "hero of two worlds."
    Read More


LIBRARY POSTS   (SEE ALL)

Many coin enthusiasts collect mint errors. These are coins that bear some sort of flaw acquired during the minting process. In general, errors are classified into three...
Though the early United States was theoretically on a bimetallic standard – with both gold and silver legal tender – the actual use of gold and silver coinage fluctuated with...
For over a century, Silver Dollar coins were workhorses of the American economy. They were used constantly in day-to-day transactions from 1794 through the mid-20th century....
In the field of modern American coins, an interesting phenomenon has developed. Ironically, coins that were extremely unpopular at the time of issue have evolved into highly...