Texas Precious Metals

    • Posted on February 20, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Many coin enthusiasts collect mint errors. These are coins that bear some sort of flaw acquired during the minting process. In general, errors are classified into three categories: planchet preparation errors, occurring when there is something wrong with the blank metal from which the coin is struck; strike errors, which occur when something goes wrong with the striking process; and hub or die errors, occurring when there is something wrong with the die itself.
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  • 11 Stunning Visualizations of Gold Show Its Value and Rarity

    Since Ancient times, gold has served a very unique function in society.

    Gold is extremely rare, impossible to create out of “thin air”, easily identifiable, malleable, and it does not tarnish. By nature of these properties, gold has been highly valued throughout history for every tiny ounce of weight. That’s why it’s been used by people for centuries as a monetary metal, a symbol of wealth, and a store of value.

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    • Posted on February 13, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Though the early United States was theoretically on a bimetallic standard – with both gold and silver legal tender – the actual use of gold and silver coinage fluctuated with the prices of those metals. The California Gold Rush of the late 1840s brought a great deal of gold onto the market. This increased the price of silver relative to gold, and much American silver coinage was exported or melted during this period.
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  • 2016 Mines & Money Presentation: Get It. Got It? Good.
    • Posted on February 10, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Videos

    A follow-up to Nobody Cares which focuses on gold's performance in 2016, the reaction to Donald Trump's election and joins a series of dots that may lead to the end of the petrodollar system and a new place for gold in the global monetary system.

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  • A long-awaited gold depository in Texas remains in limbo

    In 2015, Texas Governor Greg Abbott in 2015 signed into law an act establishing a state bullion depository at no cost to taxpayers. He intends to enter into a public-private partnership with a qualified company to provide a secure, physical depository and an agency of innovation.

    A non-banking financial facility will provide Texans with secure resources for a wide range of gold-backed financial services privately sponsored and publicly supervised by the state of Texas.

    Here is coverage from the Forth Worth Star-Telegram:

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    • Posted on February 6, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    For over a century, Silver Dollar coins were workhorses of the American economy. They were used constantly in day-to-day transactions from 1794 through the mid-20th century. Over the years, a staggering quantity were struck – around a half billion pieces in total! While quite a few of these coins have been melted and destroyed since many still remain. Today, Silver Dollars are considered both collectibles and bullion pieces. They are traded in bulk among collectors, investors, accumulators and dealers. This article describes how bulk Silver Dollars are categorized, graded and marketed.
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    • Posted on January 30, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    In the field of modern American coins, an interesting phenomenon has developed. Ironically, coins that were extremely unpopular at the time of issue have evolved into highly desirable numismatic rarities. That is, coins that were largely shunned by the public upon release have become extremely valuable and sought-after. As paradoxical as this phenomenon sounds, it has repeated itself over and over again.
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    • Posted on January 23, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    One of the most misunderstood terms in numismatics is the word “restrike.” In its strictest sense, a restrike is a coin made from original dies at a later year. However, the word is used for a wide variety of other reproductions, copies, recreations and later issues. This article will describe the various types of restrikes and how they are perceived by the numismatic marketplace.
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  • The Global War on Cash

    There is a global push by lawmakers to eliminate the use of physical cash around the world. This movement is often referred to as “The War on Cash”, and there are three major players involved:

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    • Posted on January 16, 2017
    • By TPM
    • Library

    Elgin, Illinois is not a city of particularly national importance. Nonetheless, Elgin became the subject of a US Mint-issued commemorative coin in 1936 thanks to the efforts of Trygve Rovelstad, a native of the town. Rovelstad, the son of Norwegian immigrants, sought to erect a memorial sculpture in Elgin honoring the city’s earliest settlers. He was familiar with the concept of commemorative half dollars, which were commonly issued at that time to raise funds for a specific cause. In 1935, Rovelstad was successful in lobbying his Congressman to introduce legislation authorizing a half dollar with the intent of raising funds for his memorial.
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LIBRARY POSTS   (SEE ALL)

Many coin enthusiasts collect mint errors. These are coins that bear some sort of flaw acquired during the minting process. In general, errors are classified into three...
Though the early United States was theoretically on a bimetallic standard – with both gold and silver legal tender – the actual use of gold and silver coinage fluctuated with...
For over a century, Silver Dollar coins were workhorses of the American economy. They were used constantly in day-to-day transactions from 1794 through the mid-20th century....
In the field of modern American coins, an interesting phenomenon has developed. Ironically, coins that were extremely unpopular at the time of issue have evolved into highly...